Hip
Home Knee Shoulder Hip Elbow References - Index

 

HIP LIPOHEMARTHROSIS
HIP LIPOHEMARTHROSIS

Hip

 

Lipohemarthroses of the hip are rare. They can occur from fractures of the femoral head or the acetabulum.

   

As patients with fractures of the hip are not generally placed in the standing position for radiography, only CT and MRI images have been reported. As in other joints, the appearance of a lipohemarthrosis results from fat escaping from the marrow compartment into the joint cavity. As it is less dense than blood and water, it rises to the most superior aspect of the joint when imaged with cross sectional modalities.

CASE 1: These two axial CT images are from a 45 year old male who was involved in a motor vehicle accident. He was the driver.

Image 1: This image demonstrates a posterior dislocation of the right hip. There is blood in the acetabular fossa and a low density region superior, representing a lipohemarthrosis. CLICK TO ENLARGE.

CLICK TO ENLARGE

Image 2: There is a fracture of the femur, the source of the lipohemarthrosis. CLICK TO ENLARGE.

  CLICK TO ENLARGE

bulletUniversity of Colorado Visible Man Project data: hip joint [notice the fatty and red marrow adjacent to the joint]
bulletWheeless' Online Orthopedics: hip fracture menu
bulletSearch PubMed for articles about lipohemarthrosis
bulletGO TO MAIN MENU
 

Back Next

Google
 
Web Gentili.net

The FBI Sign: CT, MRI, and Radiographic Appearance of Lipohemarthrosis
Copyright 2000-2006 S.M. Sorenson, K. Wolfson, A. Gentili, S. Masih, L.L. Seeger. All rights reserved.